Changing Views at the Sheldon Museum of Art in Lincoln

Sheldon buildling

Place at a Glance

Name/Location Sheldon Museum of Art  12th & R in Lincoln (UNL); Facebook
Open hours Closed Mondays: Tuesdays: 10-8; W-Sat. 10-5; Sundays 12-5
What to Know NO flash photography; Stroller friendly (if you use the elevators)
Cost Free; donations are accepted
Parking Meters nearby on street; garages within walking distance
Group Tours Various Tours (including education & garden); Need two weeks notice
Museum Manners No touching: if you get too close to the art, a voice will correct you
Recommended Ages Mainly for five and up (running children make them nervous J)

We had not stopped at Lincoln’s art gallery for awhile.  Possibly due to timing.  Possibly due to parking (although both of the last times I stopped, I easily found meter parking less than a block away).  But I do hope to remedy that and to start going there more often.  Several (if not all) of my kids have inherited their dad’s artistic abilities.  And I hope to continue to develop those skills.

Sheldon ceiling

The building itself is a masterpiece.

In my lifetime, I have had two excellent art teachers.  Mr. Thacker in high school and Mr. Baden in college both exposed me to a world of beauty beyond my own.  I do not remember exploring art before that time.  Sadly, while I think I have an artistic eye, my skills are nowhere near presentable.  So, hopefully I can still encourage my kids in their artistic endeavors without actually having to instruct them.  (We’ll leave that part to their talented Daddy!)

According to dictionary.com, this is the definition of art:

the quality, production, expression, or realm, according to aesthetic principles, of what is beautiful, appealing, or of more than ordinary significance.
Sheldon Statue
This statue was a part of their “Fifty Gifts for Fifty Years” exhibit this summer.  This was one of my kids’ favorite pieces.
I personally feel that art is extremely subjective.  What appeals to me aesthetically may not appeal to you.  This is definitely true for children – they do not always “get” art, especially modern pieces.  So, the fact that the Sheldon changes part of their art exhibits frequently is a gift.  If you do not like a particular style of expression, the display will be transformed to another exhibit in a few months.
I stopped by briefly when I was in downtown Lincoln researching on Tuesday.  This was the painting that caught my eye that day.
Sheldon Farmhouse
The Farmhouse by George Innes.  That painting captures the feeling of fall in Nebraska for me.  I took the picture without my flash – quite important to do in galleries.
So, you can either just walk around and admire (or wonder about) the pieces.  Or you can choose to stop to read more.
Sheldon Farmhouse text
Maybe it has never occurred to some of you to take your kids to an art gallery.  In my next post, I will tell you why I think galleries can be a great place for children.  And some suggestions on how to prepare them!
Sheldon Painting from Fifty Gifts
A painting from the “Fifty Gifts” exhibit taken without flash photography.  Can you tell that I really like the colors of fall?
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Categories: Lincoln, Metro, Nebraska Passport, Passport Pursuit Programs, Region or City, Wordless Wednesdays: Where Were We in Nebraska? | Tags: , , , , , | 1 Comment

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One thought on “Changing Views at the Sheldon Museum of Art in Lincoln

  1. I’ve never been to the Sheldon, but I want to! We’ve taken our kids to Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha a few times – I wrote about it, actually (http://www.ohmyomaha.com/2013/07/joslyn-art-museum-with-children/). As long as you can outrun your kids, it’s a fun experience.

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